Brush-tailed Rock‑wallaby, Leionema lachnaeoides and Gang-gang Cockatoo Brush-tailed Rock‑wallaby  (Ian Brown), Leionema lachnaeoides and Gang-gang Cockatoo  (Alan Page)

Threatened Species
of the Greater Blue Mountains


1. Threatened Species Legislation

At national level, legislation pertaining to threatened species is contained in the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Commonwealth EPBC Act 1999). This legislation is due to be revised at the end of 2019.

At state level, legislation pertaining to threatened species is contained in the NSW Biodiversity Conservation Act 2016 (NSW BC Act 2016). This Act came into effect in August 2017 and has replaced the previous NSW Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995.

The NSW Fisheries Management Act 1994 deals with threatened fish, however a few dragonflies are included in this Act as “fish”.


2. What is a threatened “species”?
Deane's Boronia Deane's Boronia
(Boronia deanei subsp. deanei)
(Alan Page)

In threatened species jargon, the term “species” may be used to describe all of the following:


3. Species listed as threatened under the NSW BC Act 2016
Giant Dragonfly male Giant Dragonfly
(Petalura gigantea)
(Ian Baird)

Threatened species, threatened ecological communities and extinct species, species extinct in the wild and collapsed ecological communities are listed in Schedules 1, 2 and 3 of the NSW BC Act 2016. Within Schedules 1 and 2, species are grouped according to the degree of threat they currently face. The Schedules are regularly updated. Species may be added to or deleted from each of the Schedules.

Schedule 1 lists species and populations of animals, plants, algae and fungi which are:

Schedule 2 lists ecological communities which are:

Schedule 3 lists:


4. Criteria for listing threatened species in the NSW BC Act 2016

Species listed as threatened under NSW legislation must be native to NSW or species (animals) known to periodically or occasionally migrate to NSW.

A species is eligible to be listed in Schedule 1 as:

An ecological community is eligible to be listed in Schedule 2 as:

For the purposes of Schedule 3:


5. Key Threatening Processes

Key threatening processes are listed in Schedule 4 of the NSW BC Act 2016. Threatening processes are listed because they:


6. Areas of Outstanding Biodiversity

In The NSW BC Act 2016, Areas of Outstanding Biodiversity are areas considered to contain irreplaceable biodiversity values.

An area may be declared as an area of outstanding biodiversity value if the Minister [for Environment] is of the opinion that:

  1. the area is important at a state, national or global scale, and
  2. the area makes a significant contribution to the persistence of at least one of the following:
    1. multiple species or at least one threatened species or ecological community,
    2. irreplaceable biological distinctiveness,
    3. ecological processes or ecological integrity,
    4. outstanding ecological value for education or scientific research.

The declaration of an area may relate to, but is not limited to, protecting threatened species or ecological communities, connectivity, climate refuges and migratory species.

Areas of Outstanding Biodiversity are listed in the Register of Declared Areas of Outstanding Biodiversity Value which is published on the website of the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage.

At present, four Areas of Outstanding Biodiversity Value have been declared of which one is in the Greater Blue Mountains.

The small area of known natural habitat of the critically endangered Wollemi Pine within Wollemi National Park is a Declared Area of Outstanding Biodiversity Value.


7. Threatened Species in the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area

Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area

The Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area was formed from an amalgamation of eight adjoining conservation reserves: Blue Mountains, Kanangra-Boyd, Gardens of Stone, Nattai, Wollemi, Thirlmere Lakes and Yengo National Parks and Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve. It spans the traditional lands of the Darkinjung, Darug, Dharawal, Gundungurra, Wanaruah and Wiradjuri Aboriginal nations.

Australia ratified the World Heritage Convention in 1974. To be included on the World Heritage List, a site must be of outstanding universal value and meet at least one out of ten selection criteria. The protection, management, authenticity and integrity of properties are also important considerations when listing is considered.

In 2000, the Greater Blue Mountains was granted World Heritage status because it satisfied two of the then criteria for natural values. At the end of 2004 the ten criteria of outstanding universal value were revised and renumbered. The Greater Blue Mountains was listed because it was deemed a site containing:

and

The World Heritage Area is vast, extending over 1.03 million hectares. Additions of land to the eight constituent reserves of the World Heritage Area since listing in 2000 are not yet a part of the World Heritage Area.

Threatened species in the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area

In NSW there are almost 1000 threatened species and over 100 threatened ecological communities. The World Heritage Area supports about one-fifth of NSW’s threatened species. Threatened species that have been recorded in the World Heritage Area since European settlement include at least 28 mammal, 33 bird, 4 reptile, 7 frog, one dragonfly, one snail, 100 plant and a few fungus species. There are likely to be more.

Most threatened species in the World Heritage Area are listed under both the NSW BC Act 2016 and the Commonwealth EPBC Act 1999. A few species are currently listed under only one of these Acts.

A list of threatened plants and animals recorded in the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area is provided below. The status of each species under the NSW BC Act 2016 and the Commonwealth EPBC Act 2016 is indicated. We are currently updating this list.

A list of GBMWHA Threatened Animals

A list of GBMWHA Threatened Plants

A map of the Society's Area of Interest

We are working on listing threatened populations and ecological communities within the World Heritage Area.

We are also working on listing additional threatened species, populations and ecological communities within the Society’s area of interest but outside of the World Heritage Area.